Home / News / St. Patrick’s St. Parade on St. Charles brings community together

St. Patrick’s St. Parade on St. Charles brings community together

Gilberts resident Debbie Sellers said she has no Irish ancestry to her knowledge, but that has never been a hindrance when it comes to celebrating as St. Patrick’s Day approaches.

Sellers arrived in St. Petersburg on Saturday afternoon. St. Charles “On a day like this, everyone is Irish and I think we should celebrate all ethnicities because we all come from the same background,” Patrick said at the parade. “I know there’s music and corned beef and green beer and stuff like that, but my favorite part of it all is the way people come together, the brotherhood of it all.”

St. The city of St. Charles is hosting its annual St. Charles parade, which includes a parade at the newly opened First Street Plaza before noon, followed by a parade starting at 2 p.m. Patrick rolled out the green carpet, so to speak, for his celebration.

The opening ceremony featured Irish dancers as well as a bagpipe band and a total of 20 shamrocks hidden in the city centre. Patrick also had the chance to participate in the scavenger hunt.

St. Amy Curione, event manager for the St. Charles Business Alliance, said the group is once again holding the parade, which started in 2000.

“We’ve had this for over twenty years and it’s always very popular. “We never have trouble filling our parade,” he said.

More than 80 people attended this year’s parade, Curione said, and participants included “businesses, Boy Scout groups, eight musical groups and nonprofit groups.”

“Businesses and organizations are always creating something different and going beyond just decorating their floats,” he said. “Eight groups in total is more than we normally have. It’s fun to be Irish for a day.”

St. St. Charles Mayor Lora Vitek said the parade continues to be a sign of spring and represents the first community gathering since Christmas.

“I think it’s important that we continue to do this because it brings people to our town and lets them see what St. Charles is all about,” he said. “This is an opportunity to highlight what we do and how people here love celebrating our community.”

At 8 a.m. Saturday morning, Main Street was already lined with hundreds of chairs and blankets, where people waiting to arrive later had reserved their seats.

St. Volunteer Steve Martin of St. Charles has been with St. Louis for years. Patrick said he served as a marshal for the parade and that “it meant a lot to me to see so many people come together.”

St. Steve Martin of St. Charles on Saturday. Held in St. Charles Patrick was one of dozens of volunteers helping with the parade. (For David Sharos/Beacon News)

“I’m half Irish and everyone’s happy and has a little look on their face,” Martin said as he stood at the start of the parade. “Everyone is Irish today and that is good for our businesses too. The most beautiful thing for me is brotherhood. “A lot of people will enjoy the food and drinks, but for me it’s fellowship, it’s getting together with friends and family.”

Lacee Hudec of Dundee, a member of the Dundee Scottish Pipe Band, said she was preparing to march and perform with her band in St. She said she was performing at the St. Charles for the fourth time.

Lacee Hudec of Dundee, a member of the Dundee Scottish Pipe Band, performed Saturday in St.  St. Charles  Patrick will perform at the parade.  (For David Sharos/Beacon News)
Lacee Hudec of Dundee, a member of the Dundee Scottish Pipe Band, performed Saturday in St. St. Charles Patrick will perform at the parade. (For David Sharos/Beacon News)

“I love the crowds, the energy and how everyone appreciates us. “I was a piper and now I play the drums, so I’ve done a little bit of everything,” he said.

Hudec said the parade is truly a harbinger of spring.

“After being cooped up by the cold winter, we get out of our homes and have a chance to get out into the community and see people, have good food, experiences and adrenaline, and see all the groups of people here.” Hudec said.

St.  Norm Boyd of St. Charles took his 10-month-old Great Dane, Phoebe, to St. Louis on Saturday.  Held in Charles, the annual St.  Patrick took me to the parade.  (For David Sharos/Beacon News)
St. Norm Boyd of St. Charles took his 10-month-old Great Dane, Phoebe, to St. Louis on Saturday. Held in Charles, the annual St. Patrick took me to the parade. (For David Sharos/Beacon News)

St. St. Charles resident Norm Boyd brought his 10-month-old Great Dane Phoebe to her first St. Louis coat with her own white and green coat. Even the animals got into action as Charles brought it to the parade.

“He’s 124 pounds and this is his first parade,” Boyd said, looking at his dog. “It’s pretty calm for the most part. “I enjoy all the floats, the different colors and the way people come together.”

David Sharos is a freelance reporter for The Beacon-News.

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